Courier or Light Haulier

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Speed Couriers Nationwide Ltd

10314
Original Poster

There appears to be some confusion as to what type of insurance to get. Indeed there seems to be a number coming into the industry who seem to think that, because they have a car, that what type of "van insurance" doesn't apply to them. Well for those who are too ignorant, or have been misled here is an exert from a recent online blog.

Carry goods for hire or reward and haulage

These classifications apply to delivery jobs.

Carry goods for hire or reward specifically focuses on occupations that involve multiple drops at a myriad of destinations. Haulage coverage is based more on jobs with fixed deliveries with established clients.

Be aware that while these classifications cover for any accident or incident, the actual goods themselves will need additional insurance under goods in transit cover.

Haulage and courier insurance

Haulage and courier cover are similar and can be confused when arranging insurance

If you earn money by delivering goods in a car van or lorry, you'll need haulage or courier insurance to make sure you're properly covered for the job.

Haulage insurance is a particular type of commercial insurance and is needed whether you make a full-time living from delivery work or to earn a bit of spare cash.

There's a lot of debate about the difference between a courier and a haulier, and different insurers have different definitions

There are several things to look out for when taking out courier or haulage insurance, and things such as your vehicle, the distance you travel and the amount of drop-offs you make each day could make a difference to your policy.

Learn more to ensure you get the right insurance and to keep your delivery work on the right road!

What is haulage insurance?

If you drive a van in the course of your work or business, you will need commercial van insurance. This will ensure you're properly covered if involved in an accident or if your van is damaged or stolen.

There are different types of commercial van insurance depending on the nature of your work; carriage of own goods, carriage for reward, or hire and haulage.

Somewhat confusingly, courier work can fall into the haulage or carriage for reward or hire categories, depending on the van insurer in question.

Am I a courier or a haulier?

There's a lot of debate about the difference between a courier and a haulier, and whether haulage or carriage for reward or hire is the right insurance classification for delivery work.

It's generally accepted that couriers do multiple drop-offs and hauliers drive a long way to deliver to a single load, but different insurers have different definitions.

If you class yourself as a courier but the insurance firm decides, in the event of a claim, that you have been carrying out haulage work - and vice versa - your policy could be invalid.

So the safest bet is to check with your insurance provider and make sure you both agree on the description of your role at the point when you take out the cover.

What's included under haulage cover?

Policies vary widely and it's always worth comparing a range of products to make sure you not only take out cover at the right price, but that you have the right product for your work needs.

For example, some commercial van policies are quite basic. They might cover damage to your vehicle, other vehicles and property, as well as injury to you and to other people, but not necessarily any damage to, or loss of, the goods you're transporting.

Your delivery job might well take you on long-haul trips across the continent - but don't assume that European cover is automatically included.

The following is a list of the things that might be included as standard by your van insurance or that, if not, you might want to consider as additional extras:

Breakdown cover

Courtesy vehicle hire

European cover

Windscreen cover

Goods in transit cover

Public liability

Employers' liability

Driver's personal belongings

Equipment including tarpaulin, security ties and ropes

Goods in transit cover is essential to many delivery drivers, as this covers the items you're carrying should anything happen. Customers will often want to know that you have this in place.

You can choose the insurance limit for goods in transit, but note that not all types of items will be covered. For example, things like jewellery and fine art are excluded under some goods in transit clauses, so make sure your insurance is suitable for the work you do and always read your policy documents carefully.

Will one policy cover my fleet of commercial vans?

You'll be asked for a few details about your business and how many miles you travel to deliver goods

If you have up to a specified number of vehicles - usually five, but four with some insurers - you'll need a separate policy for each one.

For a fleet above this number you can get a single commercial fleet insurance policy to cover all vehicles - and some insurers offer 'mixed fleet' policies to cover a combination of vans, lorries, cars and agricultural vehicles.

Will the size of my van make a difference to my insurance?

Yes; if your delivery vehicle weighs more than 3.5 tonnes you will need HGV haulage insurance. Vans and other vehicles weighing less than this are classed as light goods vehicles (LGVs)

Speed Couriers Nationwide Ltd

10314
Original Poster

Confusing it may be, but having none is not an option. Having the wrong insurance means you have no insurance, and that makes you an illegal driver

DMS NATIONWIDE COURIERS

5507

The problem with this industry rob, not enough people do there homework. Some just think get a van or car and thats it, they are a courier. This is one thing that annoys me when there is a great number that took the time to do there homework. These amatuers are giving us who know what they are doing a bad rep.

Speed Couriers Nationwide Ltd

10314
Original Poster

Which is why the industry needs regulating, as we keep saying.

Although some reckon that's us trying to introduce a closed shop. Far from it, we would all welcome with open arms couriers who show they've a) done their homework and b) have all the relevant documentation and c) show the same level of service that being a real courier is all about.

I would say to those that are against regulation, or a standard needed to become one, why?

I'll answer for you. Those that are against it are against it because they would find it nigh on impossible to continue to trade. They continue to ignore the legal requirements needed to drive as an occupation, indeed they actively encourage those that just wouldn't be able to do it if they did. It wouldn't be ecomically viable.

To openly offer such ridiculous rates (to actually boast about them) gives drivers little option but to drive illegally.

You can blame the drivers if you like, but armed with little to no knowledge or business acumen i'm not sure you can. The misguided trust put into those who knowingly pay unworkable rates is where i put the blame.

Nice logo by the way

Dennis

676

I thought YOU did his logo?

Anyway who would do the regulating? Mrs Bloggs who wants her idiot son's passport taking to the airport in a hurry is not going to look for 'regulated' couriers. I 100% agree regulation is needed! But I've no idea how.

mtvan.com Ltd

2185

There is also useful guidance on mtvan:

mtvan blog post about courier insurance

Dennis

676

Actually, it has to come down to a licensing system - maybe even comparable to a courier site which checks insurances before enrolling? Lol.

Speed Couriers Nationwide Ltd

10314
Original Poster

I did do his logo...i was being ironic... Anyway, nevermind that, yes extremely difficult to police, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't do something.

The same issues confront taxis. We have hackney carriage ("we've done the knowledge and had police checks, our vehicles are tested regularly as is our health") and we have minicabs ("I have no idea where i'm going, no insurance, and if we get there in one piece we'll be very lucky").

The customer knows the difference between the two and can make his/her mind up accordingly.

With a courier, the customer does NOT know the difference between a charlatan and a decent law abiding courier/courier company and that's what needs to change

Dennis

676

Yes, I often smile to myself when I see a van with something on, like Member of the Association of Insured and Regulated National Courier Blokes. Reminds me of the firm who were members of something, but when you looked into it, it was a membership of one. Lol

But Mrs Bloggs still won't look for a member of summat - best she'll do is look in Yellow Pages or tap Courier into her Google. It needs government regulation, licence plate or sign, enforced by the police, taking people off the road.

Which reminds me - I like to watch all the cops and robbers programmes on Telly and you often see them stop somebody for being uninsured, but I have NEVER heard them ask a whitevanman for H&R - have you?

DMS NATIONWIDE COURIERS

5507

Dennis said:


Yes, I often smile to myself when I see a van with something on, like Member of the Association of Insured and Regulated National Courier Blokes. Reminds me of the firm who were members of something, but when you looked into it, it was a membership of one. Lol

But Mrs Bloggs still won't look for a member of summat - best she'll do is look in Yellow Pages or tap Courier into her Google. It needs government regulation, licence plate or sign, enforced by the police, taking people off the road.

Which reminds me - I like to watch all the cops and robbers programmes on Telly and you often see them stop somebody for being uninsured, but I have NEVER heard them ask a whitevanman for H&R - have you?

I watch them myself and your right, i don't think i have seen any

DMS NATIONWIDE COURIERS

5507

Speed Couriers Nationwide Ltd said:


Which is why the industry needs regulating, as we keep saying.

Although some reckon that's us trying to introduce a closed shop. Far from it, we would all welcome with open arms couriers who show they've a) done their homework and b) have all the relevant documentation and c) show the same level of service that being a real courier is all about.

I would say to those that are against regulation, or a standard needed to become one, why?

I'll answer for you. Those that are against it are against it because they would find it nigh on impossible to continue to trade. They continue to ignore the legal requirements needed to drive as an occupation, indeed they actively encourage those that just wouldn't be able to do it if they did. It wouldn't be ecomically viable.

To openly offer such ridiculous rates (to actually boast about them) gives drivers little option but to drive illegally.

You can blame the drivers if you like, but armed with little to no knowledge or business acumen i'm not sure you can. The misguided trust put into those who knowingly pay unworkable rates is where i put the blame.

Nice logo by the way

Thought you might like it lol

sundridge speedpost

7

This is my first post

The same issues confront taxis. We have hackney carriage ("we've done the knowledge and had police checks, our vehicles are tested regularly as is our health") and we have minicabs ("I have no idea where i'm going, no insurance, and if we get there in one piece we'll be very lucky").

The customer knows the difference between the two and can make his/her mind up accordingly

Are you saying that in 2014 Minicabs are not regulated ?

we've done the knowledge ( Not minicab drivers granted ) Apart from that Minicabs are regulated to the hilt

And it is not cheap link text

Blockquote"I have no idea where i'm going, no insurance, and if we get there in one piece we'll be very lucky"

Are you really serious about that statement?

If you get on good Cab Firm you can earn more as a living than some of the shit rates i seen banded on here that people expect you to work for

Cheers Shaun

Speed Couriers Nationwide Ltd

10314
Original Poster

Thanks Shaun, you're speaking of London, which is fine, you live in London so that's your experience. However when I lived in London (Tottenham) I did experience minicabs the way i've described them above (hence my comment). But if things have changed (bear in mind i lived in London around 1990) then all i can say is it gives me hope that we can do the same as London has done, and get rid of the uninsured rustbucket minicab mentality that exists in our industry.

AM-PM Despatch

223

Simple way to regulate would be to introduce Tacho's to all light goods vehicles. Make it law that cars can't be insured for courier hire & reward/parcel deliveries.

PARCEL i

2901

Dennis said:


Yes, I often smile to myself when I see a van with something on, like Member of the Association of Insured and Regulated National Courier Blokes. Reminds me of the firm who were members of something, but when you looked into it, it was a membership of one. Lol

But Mrs Bloggs still won't look for a member of summat - best she'll do is look in Yellow Pages or tap Courier into her Google. It needs government regulation, licence plate or sign, enforced by the police, taking people off the road.

Which reminds me - I like to watch all the cops and robbers programmes on Telly and you often see them stop somebody for being uninsured, but I have NEVER heard them ask a whitevanman for H&R - have you?

Ive been stopped and ask'd for HnR IN Birmingham - luckily had just taken it out that very morning

Enjoy this discussion? Check out these related topics: New to Courier work, Courier Expert, Courier Exchange, Courier Exchange, Haulage or courier insurance, Courier expert / courier exchange, Yellow engine light, uk courier solutions, Courier Mobile App, Worst name for a Courier Company.

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